Let it build, let it explode
It’s a time that seems romantic to people now, whereas at the time, it seemed like a cynical era. There were all these worries about selling out and the Man and corporate rock and irony and sincerity. But in retrospect, being cynical just meant that you cared. There was something at stake.
mostlysignssomeportents:

Reasons for sake, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan on Flickr.

To refuse the future.
ryannorth:

gpoy

ryannorth:

gpoy

tastefullyoffensive:

Celebrities Who Look Like Mattresses [walthamstow]

Previously: Hipsterized Celebrities

brucesterling:

*So, whatever happened in 1970, one wonders

brucesterling:

*So, whatever happened in 1970, one wonders

INTERNETS

karenhealey:

INTERNETS OMG

"FEELS" HAS BEEN A LEGIT TERM SINCE AT LEAST 1782:

image

The Duchess, by Amanda Foreman.

Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, really wrote a real letter to her mother complaining about the feels in 1782.

I love everything.

brucesterling:

Monopoly

brucesterling:

Monopoly

mensrightsactivism:

theconcealedweapon:

image

Click Here

Text (would be legible on actual shirt):

  1. You have no problem with the gender wage gap. But you hate having to pay for dates.

  2. You insist that it’s a scientifically proven fact that men are stronger than women. But you complain about society believing that it’s worse for a man to hit a woman than for a woman to hit a man.

  3. You believe that the age of consent is unfair and that there’s nothing wrong with having sex with teenage girls. But when you find out that a teenage girl enjoys sex, you believe she’s the biggest slut in the world.

  4. You hate when a woman automatically assumes that a man is a douchebag before getting to know him. But when you like a woman who likes another man, you assume he’s a douchebag just because he’s not you.

  5. You believe that if women want equality, they should be drafted into the military. But you also believe that the military is not a place for women.

  6. You hate when women assume that men are like wild animals. But you believe that a woman who doesn’t cover up and make herself invisible to men is just like someone wearing a meat suit around wild animals.

  7. You hate the fact that men are bullied for not conforming to their male gender roles. But when you find out that a man disagrees with your beliefs about women’s rights, your immediate response is to try to emasculate him by comparing him to a woman as an insult.

  8. You hate when women assume that there are no nice guys. But you call yourself a nice guy and act like it’s a rare quality that should cause women to be all over you.

  9. You hate when women assume that men just want to get laid. But when you find out that a man is a feminist, you assume that he’s just doing it to get laid.

  10. You hate when women make generalizations about all men. But when a woman calls you out for being sexist, you claim that all men think like you.

  11. You insist that women should be responsible for protecting themselves from being raped. But when they follow the one piece of advice that actually works, which is being aware of red flags, you complain about them assuming that all men are rapists.

This is too fantastic.

johndarnielle:

keinlichtohneschatten:

'Dracula' by Tod Browning,1931

this scene is profound because in his delivery of this line Lugosi lets you see Dracula’s inner life: the things that speak to him, the things that make his long nights in the castle worth enduring. it’s not a menacing line, or a boasting line, or some declaration of allegiance with the darkness. in the delivery Lugosi gives, it’s a man who can’t live as others do, who is a monster to be shunned and feared and eventually murdered, sharing a small insight he’s had: one that others might have missed because they don’t keep the same hours he does, or because of preconceived ideas they have about what’s beautiful and what isn’t. something that people might have missed because they’re not like him. here’s a thing you notice if you’re like me, he says. it might pass you by if you’re not like me. but you don’t have to be me to hear it. it’s not just my truth. it’s really true.

johndarnielle:

keinlichtohneschatten:

'Dracula' by Tod Browning,1931

this scene is profound because in his delivery of this line Lugosi lets you see Dracula’s inner life: the things that speak to him, the things that make his long nights in the castle worth enduring. it’s not a menacing line, or a boasting line, or some declaration of allegiance with the darkness. in the delivery Lugosi gives, it’s a man who can’t live as others do, who is a monster to be shunned and feared and eventually murdered, sharing a small insight he’s had: one that others might have missed because they don’t keep the same hours he does, or because of preconceived ideas they have about what’s beautiful and what isn’t. something that people might have missed because they’re not like him. here’s a thing you notice if you’re like me, he says. it might pass you by if you’re not like me. but you don’t have to be me to hear it. it’s not just my truth. it’s really true.